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Although there’s been some discussion about the current state of the gambling market in Norway, it seems that things will not be changing anytime soon. A few days ago, the Norwegian government announced their stance on gambling remains unchanged, meaning only government-owned entities will be allowed to offer games in the country.

No Private Licenses

As of now, there are only two operators who conduct their business legally in Norway. These are Norsk Rikstoto and Norsk Tipping. These government-sanctioned businesses have the monopoly on the market, and that’s how things will remain in 2017.

There are many potentially interested parties, but no private entities can apply for gambling licenses in the country. According to the reports, profit is not the only concern here.

In-depth Gaming Review

Linda Helleland

Linda Helleland, the Norwegian Culture Minister

Linda Helleland, the Norwegian Culture Minister, presented the white paper featuring an in-depth review of gambling in the country. This is the first such research to be conducted since 2003, and the results are quite interesting.

According to the findings presented in the paper, there have been some significant developments in the areas of safe and responsible gambling since 2003. This progress is attributed to firm and well thought-out government policies regarding online gambling. Norway is looking to keep this positive trend going in the future.

Current Model Works

Helleland concludes that the current model works, primarily because only entities allowed to offer gaming and wagering services are regulated by the government. That way, the government can maintain a firm grasp on the operators and prevent them from going astray.

This level of responsible service would be very hard to achieve with private entities whose primary concern is, naturally, profit. Hence, the country officials believe that maintaining the status quo is the best possible answer and there is no need to allow foreign or domestic private operators inside the country.

In fact, moving forward, the government will seek to reinforce the positions of Norsk Rikstoto and Norsk Tipping further. They’ll try to establish their monopoly further by changing current legislations and gathering them all in a single act.

While private entities may be less than happy about this stance, Norway has been introducing many measures to improve the happiness and satisfaction of their people. Thus, it isn’t hard to believe this decision is based on the actual evidence and a belief that the state monopoly, accompanied by strict regulation, is better for everyone.

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