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Magnus Karlsson, a Swede from Karlstad who was charged in a RICO case for operating illegal bookmaking business in San Diego. Karlsson was charged with thirteen others who set up their bookmaking business in cooperation with Lucky Lady Casino and Card Room. The casino served as a legitimate front for their operation.

Magnus Avoids Capture

The massive operation conducted by the FBI, San Diego Police, and the IRS, saw more than 100 agents coordinate together to arrest nine of the fourteen defendants in this case. Peter Magnus Karlsson, who is known simply as Magnus in the gambling circles is one of those who managed to avoid the arrest.

The only Scandinavian in the bookmaking ring, Magnus has reportedly fled to Asia where he remains at large. The FBI stays hot on his heels, but he is out of their reach for the time being. The Swedish police have been informed about the case as well. However, it is highly unlikely that Magnus will return to the EU or the United States, as he knows he’ll be immediately arrested.This is an interesting case because it isn’t common for Scandinavians to be involved in illegal bookmaking operations in the States. The only similar occurrence from the recent past involved two brothers from Norway who ran a similar operation in California using the Macho Sports domain. Eric and Jan Harald Portocarrero were apprehended by the Norwegian authorities and shipped off to the States where they were trialed and sentenced.

A Controversial Figure

Is Magnus’ gun able to handle the fbi?

According to a number of sources close to this situation, Magnus has been a highly controversial figure in the world of online gambling for quite a while. He started his operation in Costa Rica, and later on, he moved to Asia. The Swede has certainly kept himself busy, as his endeavors included everything from sports betting to online casino and poker. However, with RICO charges hanging over his head, all of this has come to a sudden and crushing halt.Him going into hiding has left many wondering about the reasons why. Considering he’s now a wanted man, Magnus will have to spend the rest of his days in hiding, far away from his home country, which hardly seems like a pleasant alternative. However, some industry insiders are convinced that the motive behind his actions is simply a large amount of money that he wants to protect.

Illegal Gambling No Joke in the States

Indictments against Magnus and others involved in the illicit betting ring demonstrate once again that illegal gambling isn’t something to play with in the United States. Next to China, the USA is the country that goes against illegal gambling activities the hardest.While Magnus and a few others remain at large at the moment, they have the FBI and Interpol turning every stone to find them, and it probably won’t be long before they are captured. The group faces very serious charges including RICO (Racketeering Conspiracy to Conduct Enterprise Affairs), transmission of wagering information, and running an illegal gambling operation.

Magnus Karlsson was one of the financiers for the betting operations, who also provided the venue for the US customers to place their wagers. The Lucky Lady Casino provided a legal front, allowing the group to hide large amounts of illegal proceeds. This isn’t an uncommon practice for illegal business, and one of the FBI agents involved with the case described it as a “classic example.”

His involvement with the illegal gambling operations aside, Magnus was apparently well-liked in the industry by his peers and colleagues. His career in the business started years ago when he was in charge of the US-facing online poker site based out of Costa Rica. Since then, he’s been involved with a number of gaming operations previous to his latest endeavor which certainly won’t look good on his CV.

sources:
https://www.justice.gov/usao-sdca/pr/fourteen-men-charged-illegal-gambling-operation-based-out-lucky-lady-casino-and-card
Read case here:
https://tribkswb.files.wordpress.com/2016/07/16-cr-1695-ben-u-s-v-segal-indictment.pdf

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